Forestville, MD Office

(301) 420-5540

Upper Marlboro, MD Office

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FELONY CONVICTION AS A GROUND FOR DIVORCE

Divorce Attorney in Maryland Explains Felony Conviction as a Ground for Divorce Getting a divorce is never easy, especially in the state of Maryland where certain variables can affect the outcome of a divorce. There are three main requirements a couple or individual must meet in order to file for divorce in the state of Maryland but it’s always best to speak with a divorce attorney in Maryland regarding your case specifically. Fault Maryland is a state that requires “fault” in order to grant a divorce. It is also possible to be granted a divorce when there has been a voluntary separation of...

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DESERTION AS A GROUND FOR DIVORCE

Divorce Lawyer in Maryland Explains Desertion as a Ground for Divorce In order to file for divorce in the state of Maryland, several requirements must be met. Unlike no fault states, Maryland requires a specific reason for divorce. If the married couple lives apart for 12 or more months before filing for divorce, this “fault” requirement is waived. Additionally, at least one spouse must be a Maryland resident for at least one year before filing for the divorce. Divorce can be a pretty tricky subject, especially with multiple variables involved. It’s always best to consult a divorce lawyer in Maryland to...

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JUDGMENT ENFORCEMENT

When the Courts and judges issue order they expect them to be followed. Failure to pay child support can have serious consequences.   Maryland Department of Human Resources helps custodial parents with collecting child support payments from non-custodial parents. Failure to pay child support can lead to suspension of driver's license and/or professional license (license to practice law or real estate license); denial of tax refunds and other types of government benefits; garnishment of wages, property and bank account liens, etc. The parties however can work among themselves to work out how and when the payment can be made. If you are behind of paying your child support...

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PROVING PATERNITY

It is important to establish a child’s father for many reasons. It compels the father to assist in the child’s financial support and it also determines if the child has any rights to inherit from his or her alleged father when the father dies. If the father openly admits that the child is his, then establishing paternity is not an issue. If the man disputes paternity, then a paternity lawsuit must be filed to prove that he is indeed the child’s father. Proving paternity used to be established through circumstantial evidence, such as proof that the couple had...

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Divorce and Military

Divorce is always a very complicated and emotional situation for anyone who has to deal with it. When a couple decides to end their marriage and one spouse is serving in the military, divorce tends to get even more complicated. Make sure to contact an experienced attorney to help you calculate child support, determine child custody, divide retirement benefits and figure out the other complications. In regards to child support, the military has regulations establishing interim child support guidelines and each branch of the service has different child support guidelines. Courts will look at BAH, separate ration, hazard pay, special...

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Maryland Masters System

If you have a family law case in the state of Maryland that involves child custody, visitation, support or alimony, you will likely have to appear before a master. Masters originate from an old tradition when they were originally appointed to act as assistants to the English kings. Today, a master is a hearing officer who takes testimony and makes preliminary rulings and determination. Their recommendations are then submitted to a Judge to be approved or rejected. If neither party takes exceptions to the ruling of the master then a judge will pass an order ratifying the recommendations. Masters also hear...

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Representing Yourself or Hiring an Attorney

It is not uncommon for one or both parties to represent themselves in family law issues. This type of process is called “pro se” and is usually performed because of financial constraints or misconceptions about what attorneys can do. However, it is not a good idea for everyone and it is important to understand you may be missing some fundamental rights by not using an attorney. Nowadays, there are many resources available to those who wish to represent themselves. Maryland court system offers legal advice and help with legal forms in the courthouse. There is also the Women’s Law Center...

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MEDIATION

Mediation is an alternative process to solve family disputes that does not require court involvement. It involves using a neutral third party, the mediator, who will facilitate and assist the parties in coming with their resolution to mutually satisfy all parties. The role of a mediator includes facilitating communication between the parties, assisting in identifying the real issues of the dispute and the parties’ interests, and generating options for settlement. Most people have the ability to solve their own disputes but it’s important to hire a mediator to help facilitate the discussion. Make sure to consult with an experienced Family Law attorney...

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Child Abuse & Neglect

The Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) defines child abuse and neglect as, at minimum: “any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caretaker which results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation” or “an act or failure to act which presents an imminent risk of serious harm”. Federal legislation sets minimum standards for states and each state is responsible for defining child maltreatment. Definitions of child abuse and neglect are typically divided in either civil statutes or criminal statutes. Civil statutes provide definitions of child maltreatment to guide...

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Children of Divorced Same-Sex Parents

Since same-sex marriage is legal in the state of Maryland, it is important to understand the nuances and issues that could arise from divorce of same-sex marriage, including that of children. A child born or conceived during a marriage is presumed to be the legitimate child of both spouses, not just the spouse who gave birth to the child. In the past when a same sex couple adopted a child in the state of Maryland, only one of them actually adopted the child from the agency, country or service because two people without a legal tie to one another are...

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